10 Reasons Kids Get Anxious About School

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We all expect that our children will be excited and a little bit nervous about the first day of school. The first step to calming fears is identifying them. Here are ten things that make kids anxious about school:

New situations

Whether your child is facing the first day in a new grade or the first day in a new school, it’s normal to feel nervous in a new situation. Talk about what the first day of school will be like. “When children know what to expect, they experience less anxiety about a situation,” explains School Psychologist Erin L. Enyart, Ed. S.. Remind your child that everyone feels a little anxious, and allow time for them to adjust. Point out that pretty soon, the situation will be routine and comfortable. If possible, adjust your schedule so that you have extra time with your child, especially right after school, for the first few days.

Failure

Kids worry that their schoolwork will be too hard, they won’t be able to keep up, or they won’t know the correct answer when called on in class. Remind your child that everyone makes mistakes, and then praise their best efforts.

Test anxiety

Many kids are scared of testing situations. They worry ahead of time, and are unable to perform on the day of the test. One way to help is to offer your support during your child’s study so he or she feels well prepared. Remind them that they know the information, and that you are confident they will do well.

Social anxiety

Kids worry about fitting in, making friends, what others think of them, being teased, and being left out. Encourage your child to face, rather than avoid, social situations and talk about ways to make friends. According to the National Association of School Psychologists (NASP), teaching children social skills, problem solving, and conflict resolution supports good mental health.

Grades

Some kids worry about whether or not they’ll be able to earn all A’s in math, make the honor roll, or maintain a certain grade point average. Remind your child that you do not expect perfection.

Stress

Some kids become anxious or stressed out when they feel that their school environment is unorganized, or that classroom expectations are unreasonable. The NASP suggests that parents can help kids learn to deal constructively with challenging situations by offering to help come up with a solution together when your child tells you about a problem.

Making the team

Whether your child wants to make the cheerleading squad, get a part in the school play, or simply not be the last one picked for kickball at recess, it is important to remind them that not everyone succeeds every time. There are always other opportunities to be involved or be a part of a team. Practice together: fluff the pom-poms, rehearse the lines, or roll the ball to help your child master the skills of their choice.

Peer pressure

Kids just want to fit in. They may worry about what their classmates expect from them. Encourage your child to talk about their concerns. Putting fears into words may be helpful. Listen, but in most situations, the NASP says, “resist the urge to jump in and fix a problem for your child—instead, think it through and come up with possible solutions together. Problem-solve with kids, rather than solve it for them. By taking an active role, kids learn how to tackle a problem independently.”

Being bullied

Kids worry about others tormenting them in some way, and this can be extremely upsetting. Take their concern seriously. Explain that bullies feel powerful when they upset other students, and talk about ways to cool down without giving the bully the reaction they want. Have your child practice ignoring teasing remarks, walking away, and getting an adult.

Home situation

According to Kidshealth.org, sometimes the reason a child doesn’t want to go to school “actually has nothing to do with the school. They may feel they’re needed at home because a parent is stressed or depressed, or because of something else affecting the family. If that’s the case, the answer involves addressing the family issue.”

Enyart says if the fears persist into the school year, inform your child’s teacher. At most schools, a guidance counselor, social worker, or school psychologist are available to talk with children and help them overcome these fears. There are also counseling groups led by these school staff members which address children’s needs.

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Source: http://www.education.com/magazine/article/10-kids-anxious-school/

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