Category Archives: Family

Get Back into the School Routine

Reduce stress with these simple, time-saving, mood-lifting strategies.

  1. Start your day the night before. Prepare snacks and clothes and solidify the next day’s plan at night. Fill your child’s backpack with the things that they may need for school or for an after-school play date.
  2. Wake up earlier. Give yourself and your child extra time in the morning — even 15 minutes will help. Try using an alarm clock that plays soothing nature sounds or happy music to make wake-up time more fun.
  3. Send only teacher-approved items to school. Talk to your child’s teacher about classroom rules before sending in anything. Most teachers do not want children bringing in valuable items or toys that encourage aggressive play, but will likely encourage a favorite book or photograph.
  4. Create a special drop-off ritual. Come up with a memorable, loving way to say goodbye — a lipstick kiss on the hand, a secret handshake, or a special phrase that you create with your child.
  5. Set aside after-school downtime. Some children experience a meltdown at the end of the day. To avoid this, try to build in some time to unwind after school. Allow your child to visit the playground, spend time alone curled up with a book, or engage in quiet activities such as painting, building with blocks, or solitary imaginative play.
  6. Make dinnertime family time. Whenever possible, eat together as a family. Kids benefit from spontaneous dinner-table conversations. Ask your child to tell you about their day and share interesting things that happened to you. They will feel more “grown up” when they are included in this sort of conversation.
  7. Follow the school’s rules. Teachers count on families to support the classroom rules and routines — such as sick-child policies, authorized escorts, and arriving on time.
  8. Give your child undivided attention. Set aside time each day just to be with your child — even if it’s just 20 minutes — and allow no interruptions. Follow their lead and take time to observe their interests and enter their world. You will learn a lot about your child, and they will be thrilled to have this time with you.

5 Ways to Help Your Child Stay Organized

Instilling a little order in your child’s study habits will allow a lot more time for actual studying! Put these five tips into practice and help build good habits now.

  1. Set up a Designated Study Space — Make sure there’s an area of your house just for homework, with all the supplies she needs in bins and boxes. Provide plenty of space for books and set up baskets for papers so your child can find old homework to review for tests.
  2. Color Code Subjects — Buy school supplies for each subject in a different color, so your child can see at a glance which folder, notebook, and binder has to do with which subject.
  3. Create a Cubby Hole at Home — Place a crate or sturdy box near your front door so your child can keep his backpack and other school items in one spot. Teach him to put anything he needs for the next day in that place as well. That way, he’ll know where his stuff is when he’s looking for it.
  4. Use a Calendar — Give your child a date book or other portable calendar that she can bring with her to school. Teach her to write down assignments, tests, play dates, lessons, and other plans regularly. Also have her write down her classmates’ phone numbers and e-mail addresses so she can find and contact them easily.
  5. Set a Good Example — If you keep things neat and organized in your own life, your child is more likely to follow suit. If he has trouble making “to-do” lists, sit down and make one alongside him. Seeing you turn off the TV at a regular time to pay bills or even just to read will show him the importance of setting aside time to do things and sticking to it.

Omega Learning® Center is AdvancED accredited nationwide and provides tutoring and test preparation services for grades K-12. To find a learning center near you, visit OmegaLearning.com.

Source: http://www.scholastic.com/parents/resources/article/getting-organized/5-ways-to-help-your-child-stay-organized

6 Back-to-School Tips Every Student Can Use

Students, does it really matter how you start the school year? In a word, yes.

With that, we wanted to give you 6 quick back to school tips to help students get the year off on the right foot. If you want to make sure you’re getting the most out of your semester, give these a shot.

Back to school tip #1: Get an organization system set in your mind before you start school

Systems make things easy. That’s just the way it is.

But too many students think that if they just get supplies to stay organized, Boom! it happens. They’re organized!

But it doesn’t work that way. Disorganized students rarely (like really rarely — as in flying pig rarely — or professional wrestler with a PhD rarely) get disorganized because they lack the proper tools. Disorganization almost always comes from the lack of an organizational system to use those tools.

Back to school tip #2: Make sure you have the right tools

Organization systems are important, and having the right tools make them easier to use. Do you have a tool to keep your assignments in one place? How about a tool that lets you know what due dates are coming up? What about a tool that helps you stay on track today to make sure you get all your homework done?

If you have tools for each of these, you should be set. If you’re not sure, our recommendation is to try a study skills course where we train students in how to use the right tools.

Back to school tip #3: Prepare yourself to do some work

Back to school time means it’s back to work time. Learning is work. It’s hard work. It’s not always super fun.

Prepare yourself, young grasshopper. We recommend putting a time on your calendar that you plan to study each day. This will help you mentally prep for the work ahead of you. Expect to study at least 5 days a week (sad, I know, but it’s what it will take to stay on top of your work and your stress level).

Back to school tip #4: Get in a routine

Are you waking up at the crack of noon? It’s probably time to revisit that alarm clock and start waking up before the sun starts going down. Developing any kind of routine is a great first step toward hitting that back to school grind

Back to school tip #5: Brush up on your study skills

We had to say it. Study skills impact everything about your education — grades, time spent, stress levels, advancement, and we could keep going. Check out our the essential study skills course for some free resources.

Back to school tip #6: Go to sleep

It helps. Trust me. When you get some rest, you’ll be a much happier camper when the daily homework kicks up to hyper-speed again.

If you have any other tips, we’d love to hear them on social media – let’s keep the conversation going.

Omega Learning® Center is AdvancED accredited nationwide and provides tutoring and test preparation services for grades K-12. To find a learning center near you, visit OmegaLearning.com.

Source: https://www.studyright.net/blog/6-back-to-school-tips/

7 Ways to Boost SAT Score for ADHD Students

Standardized tests aren’t fun for anyone, especially students with ADHD. From re-reading math problems to crossing out wrong answers, these seven strategies can boost your SAT score and give you a leg up on college admissions.

The SAT college admissions test is not exactly ADHD-friendly.

Most teens with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) would agree that sitting in a seat for four hours answering questions bearing little relevance to a teen’s life isn’t a recipe for earning a blowout score. You’ll lose interest. Your mind will wander. Worse, your ADHD mind will space out and lose focus on everything.

What to do? Use these seven tips for helping teens with ADHD maximize their efforts on the SAT test and earn the high scores that colleges want.

Talk It Out

Instead of quickly deciding whether an answer is right or wrong, tell yourself, in words, why one answer is better than another.

By talking through your reasoning, you can check your thought process and find mistakes. In fact, verbalize all questions and answers to yourself. It will ensure that your brain hasn’t skipped over important information.

Don’t Rush

It’s better to work slowly and carefully.

Questions in each SAT section get increasingly difficult as you go along, but the hard ones at the end are worth the same number of points as the easy and intermediate ones. If you rush through the test, you are likely to make errors that will cost you points on the easier questions.

Write On the Test Booklet

Not only is it OK to write on the test, you should do it. Take notes, do calculations, create an outline. When you write things down, you are more likely to get a problem correct.

Quiz Yourself

Ask yourself comprehension questions in order to narrow the choices and to move toward the right answer.

Some good comprehension questions include: “What information is the question asking me for?” or “What type of word is missing from the sentence — a thing, action, or description?” or “What opinion am I being asked to agree or disagree with?”

Re-Read Those Math Questions

This is probably the easiest thing you can do to improve your score.

Math problems in school are easy to understand, but hard to solve. SAT math questions are harder to understand, but easier to solve. The challenge is to determine what information they are asking for.

Unless you re-read the question, you may have forgotten it by the time you’re ready to answer it.

Mark Wrong Answer Choices

If you determine that an answer choice is wrong, don’t just skip it, cross it off. That way, you will remember that it’s wrong if you come back to the problem. When you do cross it off, draw a line only through the letter, not the entire answer choice. You won’t have as much erasing to do if you decide that it may be correct when you review it again.

Take a Break

If you notice you’re getting tired and lazy — you start to skip problems or cut corners — rest your brain.

Halfway through each section, put your pencil down, look away from the test, and think about anything else for two to three minutes. Remember to take these breaks in the middle of a section after you’ve answered questions. Taking a break before doing so will make it tougher to regain your focus.

Omega Learning® Center is AdvancED accredited nationwide and provides tutoring and test preparation services for grades K-12. To find a learning center near you, visit OmegaLearning.com.

Source: https://www.additudemag.com/sat-prep-high-school-study-skills-adhd/

Parent Action Plan: Middle School

Middle school is important because your child is laying the foundation in a lot of subjects and forming study habits. Developing certain skills now will make it easier for your child to adjust to the challenges of high school and college later — and will lead to more college options. Here are some things you and your child can do to make the most of this time.

  1. Help your child set goals for the year. Working toward specific goals will help your child stay motivated and focused.
  2. Review the school calendar together. Note important dates and put them in a shared online calendar or in an easy-to-view place, such as a bulletin board in your kitchen.
  3. Make a plan to check in regularly about schoolwork. If you keep up with your child’s tests, papers and homework assignments, you can celebrate successes and head off problems as a team.
  4. Talk about extracurricular activities. Getting involved in clubs and other groups is a great way for your child to identify interests and feel more engaged in school.
  5. Discuss ways to take on challenges. Encourage your child to take the most-challenging courses that he or she can handle. Tackling tough courses can give your child confidence and prepare him or her for higher-level high school classes.
  6. Come up with fun reading ideas. Look for magazines or newspapers your child may like and talk about the books you loved reading when you were your child’s age. If your family makes reading enjoyable, it can become a daily habit.
  7. Visit a nearby college together. If you live near a college, look for upcoming events on campus that are open to the community or see if the college offers classes to local children and families. Just being on a campus may get your child interested in college.
  8. Get the big picture on paying for college. It’s not too early to learn the basics of financial aid.

Omega Learning® Center is AdvancED accredited nationwide and provides tutoring and test preparation services for grades K-12. To find a learning center near you, visit OmegaLearning.com.

Source: https://bigfuture.collegeboard.org/get-started/for-parents/parent-action-plan-middle-school

Parents: 9 Back to School Pro Tips

Back to school time can be a hectic time for both you and the kiddos. These are some of our best back to school tips to help ensure this school year gets off to a great start!

1. Visit the school

Walk or ride the route your child will take and make note of school patrols, crossing guards and high traffic areas along the way. Talk to your kids about NOT talking to strangers and find out what, if any, policies your child’s school has regarding early arrivals or late pick-ups. Learn about the school’s entrance and exit policies. Then, if you can, pop in and check out what the inside of the school looks like.

2. Introduce yourself to your child’s teacher

Introduce yourself to your child’s teacher and ask him or her about the preferred method of communication. (Some teachers are active on email and social media, while others prefer the phone or in-person meetings.)

3. Make homework a priority

Make homework time a daily habit. Find a quiet and consistent place at home where your child can complete his or her homework. If your child is having difficulty with his or her homework, make an appointment with the teacher sooner rather than later.

4. Prepare a study area

Set up a special place at home to do school work and homework. Remove distractions. Make it clear that education is a top priority in your family: show interest and praise your child’s work.

5. Take charge of TV time 

Limit the time that you let your child watch TV, and when you do decide to do TV time, make it a family affair. Talk together about what you see and ask questions after the show ends.

6. Get everyone to bed on time

During the summer, children aren’t always on a schedule, which is understandable. But, proper rest is essential for a healthy and productive school year. Help your kids get back on track sleep-wise by having them go to bed earlier and wake up earlier at least a week in advance of when school actually starts.

7. Make healthy meals

Let’s face it – no one can concentrate when they’re hungry. Studies show that children who eat healthy, balanced breakfasts and lunches do better in school. Fix nutritious meals at home, and, if you need extra help, find out if your family qualifies for any child nutrition programs, like the National School Lunch Program.

8. Get a check up

It’s a good idea to take your child in for a physical and an eye exam before school starts. Most schools require up-to-date immunizations, and you may be asked to provide paperwork showing that your child has all the necessary shots and vaccines. So, check your state’s immunization requirements. And, always keep your own copies of any medical records.

9. Plan to read with your child everyday

Make a plan to read with your child for 20 minutes every day. Your example reinforces the importance of literacy, and reading lets you and your child explore new worlds of fun and adventure together.

 

Omega Learning® Center is AdvancED accredited nationwide and provides tutoring and test preparation services for grades K-12. To find a learning center near you, visit OmegaLearning.com.

Source: https://blog.ed.gov/2016/08/9-back-to-school-pro-tips/

How to Handle Back-to-School Anxiety

 

Feelings of anxiety are perfectly normal and to be expected during times of transition. While many people think of separation anxiety as a problem confined to toddlers and preschoolers, I also see it in elementary and middle school kids. And back-to-school anxiety can occur clear through high school!

Some kids are more hard-wired for anxious thoughts and feelings than others. While some level of anxiety affects most people, high levels of anxiety can be disruptive to both the child and the whole family.

Know the Signs
Some worries are to be expected. It’s not easy to walk into a new classroom with a new teacher and start from scratch every single year. Watch for these sneaky symptoms of anxiety as the new school year begins:

  • changes in eating habits
  • sleep disturbance
  • clingy behavior
  • meltdowns or tantrums
  • nail biting, hair twirling, skin picking
  • headaches or stomach pains
  • avoiding normal daily activities
  • increased irritability
  • increased crying
  • social isolation

If your child exhibits some of these symptoms for more than two weeks, get an evaluation. Many children can work through back-to-school anxiety independently, but when anxiety interferes with normal daily living, kids need help.

How to Deal with Back-to-School Anxiety
Consistency and routines are always a great place to start when it comes to squashing those back-to-school worries! Try some of these strategies to help your child ease into the new school year:

Attend school (and be early!). While it’s perfectly normal to have worries when starting a new school year, it’s very important to attend school each day. A huge meltdown might have you wondering if you should simply try another day, but avoidance of school will only increase and reinforce your child’s anxiety. Missing school because of anxiety robs your child of the chance to gain mastery, make friends, enjoy a successful school day and develop a relationship with the teacher.

Get back to basics. It’s very difficult to feel calm, confident and in control when you are starving or exhausted. Anxiety can cause kids to struggle with sleep and eat a little less. This means that parents have to stay on top of those childhood basics.

Set an earlier bedtime for the entire family, make sure each day includes plenty of downtime, and provide balanced meals and nutritious snacks with plenty of time to eat. Eating on the run is stressful for kids.

Allow extra time in the mornings. Anxious children don’t like to be late, nor do they enjoy being rushed. Now that you’ve pushed that bedtime up, your child should be able to wake with plenty of time to eat, get dressed and get ready for the day.

Create healthy nighttime routines to make the mornings easier. Choosing clothes at night, packing snacks and filling water bottles and packing the backpack and placing it by the door are all time savers for anxious kids.

Avoid blanket statements. When kids express worries about school, it’s tempting to respond with generic statements such as, “Don’t worry about it!” or “You’ll love it!” These statements rarely provide reassurance for worriers. A better tactic is to address specific worries with your child.

When parents take the time to listen and help children come up with strategies to solve problems, kids feel more confident. If your child is worried about where to sit at lunch, for example, have him draw a map of the lunchroom and discuss possibilities.

Role-play. The best way to gain mastery over worries is to practice taking control of worrisome situations. Have your child create a list of school-related worries and act out different ways to solve the problems. I like to have kids try out two or three solutions per problem so that they always have a back-up plan.

Watch your words. Kids look to their parents for clues. If you appear overwhelmed and anxious on the first day of school, your child is likely to follow your lead.

It’s perfectly natural for parents to have worries at the beginning of the school year. Instead of hyper-focusing on the potential negatives or faking it, take the time to talk about feelings and worries as a family. When families work through their feelings together, they empower one another.

Back-to-school anxiety can be stressful for families. More often than not, the anxiety decreases as the child adjusts to the new school year. If the anxiety persists, seek help. It’s far better to learn to manage anxious feelings than to suffer in silence and struggle through the school year.

Source: http://www.pbs.org/parents/expert-tips-advice/2016/08/cope-back-school-anxiety/

6 Ways to Get Organized for Back to School

Putting the following strategies into action now will save a lot of time and anxiety later.

  1. Shift your schedules. The lazy, unstructured days of summer are ending, and so is your child’s freedom to sleep in and eat erratically. Ease them back into a school schedule by shifting their bedtime back to a school-day bedtime and waking them closer to the hour they’ll need to rise.
  2. Have a morning routine run-through. The week before school starts, start getting your child up, dressed, and fed at the same times as you would on a school day. Both you and your child will benefit from a few practice runs to smooth out trouble spots and get comfortable with the routine.
  3. Clean house. Go through your child’s clothes, and get rid of anything they have outgrown or worn threadbare. It’ll be easier to choose outfits if there’s less clutter. Do a thorough cleaning of their room and study area as well.
  4. Stock up on supplies. After you and your child are through cleaning, make a list of everything they’ll need for the coming year, from socks to crayons. Ask their teacher or the school for a list of supplies, and check what’s missing. Buy extras of essential items and store them for later.
  5. Get papers in order. While you’re calling the school, ask what paperwork your child will need to start. Take care of any missing vaccinations or forms ASAP, then gather all the papers in a large, clearly marked envelope or file and photocopy everything.
  6. Create calendar and file central. Set up an area with a large calendar so everyone in your family can see everyone else’s plans for that month. For added organization, color-code each family member and keep colored markers nearby so everyone can easily mark plans. Pen in after-school activities, lessons, play-dates, and family time. Nearby, set up file baskets or bins marked “To Be Signed,” “From School,” and “To School,” so your child can deposit papers you need to see in a regular place right after school and pick up things to go “To School” each morning.

Omega Learning® Center is AdvancED accredited nationwide and provides tutoring and test preparation services for grades K-12. To find a learning center near you, visit OmegaLearning.com.

Source: http://www.scholastic.com/parents/resources/article/back-to-school/6-ways-to-get-organized-back-to-school

20 Ways to Boost Your Baby’s Brain Power

At birth, your baby’s brain contains 100 billion neurons (as many as there are stars in the Milky Way)! During their first years, they will grow trillions of brain-cell connections, called neural synapses.

The rule for brain wiring is “use it or lose it.” Synapses that are not “wired together” through stimulation are pruned and lost during a child’s school years. Although an infant’s brain does have some neurological hard wiring (such as the ability to learn any language), it is more pliable and more vulnerable than an adult’s brain. And, amazingly, a toddler’s brain has twice as many neural connections as an adult’s.

When you provide loving, language-enriched experiences for your baby, you are giving his brain’s neural connections and pathways more chances to become wired together. In turn, they will acquire rich language, reasoning, and planning skills.

  1. Give your baby a physically healthy start before he is born. Stay healthy while you are pregnant, and be aware that certain drugs can be destructive to your baby’s brain in utero. Many children who were drug-abused in the womb struggle with severe learning problems and suddenly act with unprovoked aggressive behaviors. Studies have also revealed that cigarette smoking during pregnancy causes lower fourth-grade reading scores.
  2. Have meaningful conversations. Respond to infant coos with delighted vocalizations. Slowly draw out your syllables in a high-pitched voice as you exclaim, “Pretty baby!” This talk is called “parentese.” The areas in the brain for understanding speech and producing language need your rich input.
  3. Play games that involve the hands (patty-cake, peekaboo, this little piggy). Babies respond well to learning simple sequential games.
  4. Be attentive. When your baby points, be sure to follow with your gaze and remark on items or events of interest to her. This “joint attention” confirms for your baby how important her interests and observations are to you.
  5. Foster an early passion for books. Choose books with large and colorful pictures, and share your baby’s delight in pointing and making noises — say, the animal sounds to go along with farm pictures. Modulate the tone of your voice; simplify or elaborate on story lines; encourage toddlers to talk about books. Remember that building your baby’s receptive language (understanding spoken words) is more important than developing his expressive language (speaking) in infancy.
  6. Use diaper time to build your baby’s emotional feelings of having a “lovable body.” Stroke your baby’s tummy and hair. Studies have shown that babies who are not often touched have brains that are smaller than normal for their age. Also, when diapering your baby, you are at the ideal 12 to 18 inches from her eyes to attract attention to your speech.
  7. Choose developmentally appropriate toys that allow babies to explore and interact. Toys such as a windup jack-in-the-box or stackable blocks help your baby learn cause-and-effect relationships and “if-then” reasoning. If a baby stacks a big block on a smaller one, the top block falls off. If he successfully stacks a small block on a bigger one, he “wires in” the information.
  8. Respond promptly when your baby cries. Soothe, nurture, cuddle, and reassure him so that you build positive brain circuitry in the limbic area of the brain, which relates to emotions. Your calm holding and cuddling, and your day-to-day intimate engagement with your baby, signal emotional security to the brain.
  9. Build trust by being attentive and focused. Babies who are securely attached to you emotionally will be able to invest more life energy in the pleasures of exploration, learning, and discovery.
  10. Use body massage to decrease your infant’s stress and enhance her feelings of well-being and emotional security. Loving touches promote growth in young babies. Research has shown that premature babies who are massaged three times daily are ready to leave the hospital days earlier than babies who do not receive massages.
  11. Enlist help from your toddler at clean-up times — a good way to practice categorization. Toddlers learn that stuffed animals have one place to go for “night-night” time; cars, trucks, and other vehicles also have their special storage place. Children need to learn about sorting into categories and seriation (placing things in order; for example, from littlest to biggest) as part of their cognitive advancement in preschool.
  12. Set up a safe environment for your crawling baby or toddler. Spatial learning is important, and your mobile child will begin to understand parameters such as under, over, near, and far. He will be able to establish mental maps of his environment and a comfortable relationship with the world in which he lives.
  13. Sing songs such as “Itsy Bitsy Spider” and “Ring-Around-the-Rosy.” The body motions and finger play will help your baby integrate sounds with large and small motor actions. Songs also enhance your child’s learning of rhythms, rhymes, and language patterns.
  14. Match your tempo to your child’s temperament. Some children adjust easily to strange situations, some are bold and impulsive, and some are quite shy. Go with the flow as you try to increase a shy child’s courage and comfort level. Help a highly active child safely use his wonderful energy while learning impulse control. Your acceptance will give him the comfort he needs to experiment and learn freely.
  15. Make meals and rest times positive. Say the names of foods out loud as your baby eats. Express pleasure as she learns to feed herself, no matter how messy the initial attempts may be. This will wire in good associations with mealtime and eating. Battles and nagging about food can lead to negative emotional brain patterns.
  16. Provide clear responses to your baby’s actions. A young, developing brain learns to make sense of the world if you respond to your child’s behavior in predictable, reassuring, and appropriate ways. Be consistent.
  17. Use positive discipline. Create clear consequences without frightening or causing shame to your child. If your toddler acts inappropriately, such as by hitting another child, get down to his eye level, use a low, serious tone of voice, and clearly restate the rule. Keep rules simple, consistent, and reasonable for your child’s age. Expecting a toddling baby not to touch a glass vase on a coffee table is not reasonable. Expecting a toddler to keep sand in the sandbox and not throw it is reasonable.
  18. Model empathic feelings for others. Use “teachable moments” when someone seems sad or upset to help your toddler learn about feelings, caring, sharing, and kindness. The more brain connections you create for empathic responses and gentle courtesies, the more these brain circuits will be wired in. This helps not only with language and cognitive learning, but with positive emotional skills, too!
  19. Arrange supervised play with messy materials, such as water, sand, and even mud. This will teach your toddler about the physics and properties of mixtures and textures, liquids and solids. During bath time, the brain wires in knowledge about water, slippery soap, and terry towel textures. Sensory experiences are grist for the learning brain.
  20. Express joy and interest in your baby. Let your body language, your shining eyes, your attentiveness to babbling and baby activities, and your gentle caresses and smiles validate the deeply lovable nature of your little one.

Source: http://www.scholastic.com/parents/resources/article/thinking-skills-learning-styles/20-ways-to-boost-your-babys-brain-power

Moving Ahead in Math and Science

When it comes to mathematics, middle schoolers continue to develop proficiency in computing with whole numbers, fractions, decimals, and percentages. They also delve more deeply into geometry, probability, and statistics, and start honing their algebraic reasoning skills. Data analysis is a major focus, with students recording and analyzing information in tables, charts, and graphs.

The idea is to help students identify patterns of change and linear and non-linear relationships — a crucial component of algebra and other advanced forms of math and science. Other things that middle-school students will work on:

A Push Toward Algebra

A movement to make math more rigorous in the middle-school years has resulted in an increased emphasis on algebra, and a push to integrate it with geometry and other topics in the curriculum. The reason: as a “gatekeeper” to more advanced studies, algebra provides children with a clear advantage. Consequently, many schools push pre-algebra and algebraic reasoning at an earlier age. In 6th grade, for instance, children will solve word problems using graphs, tables, and equations. They will also work to solve simple equations containing a variable, such as 27 = 4x + 3. Eventually, students will become more adept at translating word and geometric problems into equations, and solving them.

 

Physical, Life, and Earth Sciences

Middle-school students delve into more sophisticated hands-on science activities and experiments, and material that continues to deepen their understanding of these three disciplines. Concepts, skills, and terminology become more advanced, laying the groundwork for high school biology, chemistry, and physics.For example, students might examine the structure of cells, atoms, and molecules, study the periodic table and various chemical reactions, learn about the tectonic plates, and examine the hows and whys of earthquakes and volcanoes. Students will be expected to do more research, using outside sources such as reference books, magazine articles, and the Internet. And they’ll be asked to share their work in written, oral, or multimedia presentations.

 

More and More Math

Math will play a larger part in science during the middle-school years, as students measure, weigh, calculate, and record data in graphs, charts, and diagrams.They learn to become more systematic in how they control variables, make observations, collect evidence, and record data. Middle-school students may get additional opportunities to plan, conduct, and showcase their own experiments at science fairs. Fairs, which can be classroom-based, school-wide, or regional, require students to conduct an independent-research project on a subject of their own choosing, then exhibit and defend their findings.

Omega Learning® Center offers Tutoring K-12 with certified teachers for every subject in school. Stop by an Omega Learning® Center near you. http://omegalearning.com/find-tutors/ 

 

Source: http://www.scholastic.com/parents/resources/article/what-to-expect-grade/moving-ahead-math-and-science