Category Archives: Study Skills

Get Back into the School Routine

Reduce stress with these simple, time-saving, mood-lifting strategies.

  1. Start your day the night before. Prepare snacks and clothes and solidify the next day’s plan at night. Fill your child’s backpack with the things that they may need for school or for an after-school play date.
  2. Wake up earlier. Give yourself and your child extra time in the morning — even 15 minutes will help. Try using an alarm clock that plays soothing nature sounds or happy music to make wake-up time more fun.
  3. Send only teacher-approved items to school. Talk to your child’s teacher about classroom rules before sending in anything. Most teachers do not want children bringing in valuable items or toys that encourage aggressive play, but will likely encourage a favorite book or photograph.
  4. Create a special drop-off ritual. Come up with a memorable, loving way to say goodbye — a lipstick kiss on the hand, a secret handshake, or a special phrase that you create with your child.
  5. Set aside after-school downtime. Some children experience a meltdown at the end of the day. To avoid this, try to build in some time to unwind after school. Allow your child to visit the playground, spend time alone curled up with a book, or engage in quiet activities such as painting, building with blocks, or solitary imaginative play.
  6. Make dinnertime family time. Whenever possible, eat together as a family. Kids benefit from spontaneous dinner-table conversations. Ask your child to tell you about their day and share interesting things that happened to you. They will feel more “grown up” when they are included in this sort of conversation.
  7. Follow the school’s rules. Teachers count on families to support the classroom rules and routines — such as sick-child policies, authorized escorts, and arriving on time.
  8. Give your child undivided attention. Set aside time each day just to be with your child — even if it’s just 20 minutes — and allow no interruptions. Follow their lead and take time to observe their interests and enter their world. You will learn a lot about your child, and they will be thrilled to have this time with you.

5 Ways to Help Your Child Stay Organized

Instilling a little order in your child’s study habits will allow a lot more time for actual studying! Put these five tips into practice and help build good habits now.

  1. Set up a Designated Study Space — Make sure there’s an area of your house just for homework, with all the supplies she needs in bins and boxes. Provide plenty of space for books and set up baskets for papers so your child can find old homework to review for tests.
  2. Color Code Subjects — Buy school supplies for each subject in a different color, so your child can see at a glance which folder, notebook, and binder has to do with which subject.
  3. Create a Cubby Hole at Home — Place a crate or sturdy box near your front door so your child can keep his backpack and other school items in one spot. Teach him to put anything he needs for the next day in that place as well. That way, he’ll know where his stuff is when he’s looking for it.
  4. Use a Calendar — Give your child a date book or other portable calendar that she can bring with her to school. Teach her to write down assignments, tests, play dates, lessons, and other plans regularly. Also have her write down her classmates’ phone numbers and e-mail addresses so she can find and contact them easily.
  5. Set a Good Example — If you keep things neat and organized in your own life, your child is more likely to follow suit. If he has trouble making “to-do” lists, sit down and make one alongside him. Seeing you turn off the TV at a regular time to pay bills or even just to read will show him the importance of setting aside time to do things and sticking to it.

Omega Learning® Center is AdvancED accredited nationwide and provides tutoring and test preparation services for grades K-12. To find a learning center near you, visit OmegaLearning.com.

Source: http://www.scholastic.com/parents/resources/article/getting-organized/5-ways-to-help-your-child-stay-organized

Who Does Omega Help?

  1. Omega helps students who have just begun having difficulty with a subject or combination of subjects. They may have even achieved straight “A’s” all through elementary school. Now their skill gaps are evident through falling grades and confidence.
  2. Omega helps students who have always struggled in school and don’t know why. Their grades are inconsistent and they lack confidence. They have never had their child tested and are concerned there may be a learning disability or ADHD.
  3. Omega helps students who know they have a learning disability. These students know their deficiencies and respond well to year-round tutoring. They know Omega could never fill all of the skills gaps in all of their academic areas. Our tutors complement their IEP accommodations in school.
  4. Omega helps students who want to maintain their good grades through honors classes. They are concerned that, without our extra help, they will fall behind. The Woodcock Johnson may show advanced grade placement or no skill gaps. But our goal is to ease their anxiety throughout the school year with classes as needed.
  5. Omega helps students who want to improve a letter grade. This is the average student who just needs that extra help. The student needs us to keep them focused throughout the school year with test preparation, homework help, and study skills.
  6. Omega helps students who need the instruction and/or positive reinforcement that a tutor can provide. Some children are very shy and lack self-confidence. They don’t ask questions publicly in school. They do OK with classwork, but freeze on tests and quizzes with performance anxiety.
  7. Omega helps students who need homework help because of poor study skills and time management. They need our structured homework environment and study skills instruction (time management, agenda organization, test prep, listening skills, note-taking).

Omega Learning® Center is AdvancED accredited nationwide and provides tutoring and test preparation services for grades K-12. To find a learning center near you, visit OmegaLearning.com.

 

Understanding Introverted Students

In any classroom today about 10 students likely are introverts, and while the trait has gotten a lot more attention lately, experts say educators often aren’t doing enough to help those students succeed and some policies are making school unnecessarily challenging for them.

Marsha Pinto, a 21-year-old advocate for introverts, says she was quiet as a middle school student, sat in the back of the classroom and liked to read rather than socialize, though she worked hard.

“But I had one teacher in sixth grade who insisted I speak up loudly and threatened me with lower grades if I didn’t participate,” she says. “When I was bullied by some other girls, she even claimed that it was my fault for being so quiet.”

Pinto’s story could be repeated by others, though often the problems introverts face are more subtle―when educators reward extroverts for being outspoken leaders, promote social interaction, and make groupwork the norm even though some students thrive when they are working alone. “Middle school was very hard for me,” says Pinto. “For a lot of reasons it is difficult for quiet students, and the classroom structure itself is sometimes one of them.”

About the Quiet Kids

About a third of us are introverts, more than half because of genetics, sometimes from upbringing, and sometimes from “random events that are hard to quantify,” according to John Zewlenski, a psychology professor at Carleton College who has studied introversion. Traumatic events could cause it, or being thrust into a restrained role with family or friends.

Psychologist Carl Jung coined the term in 1920, but experts since have more clearly defined it. They’ve seen its unique brain patterns and, to the relief of introverts, have distinguished it from shyness, a crippling anxiety over social interaction. Linda Silverman, director of the Gifted Development Center in Denver and author of Upside-Down Brilliance, says extroverts get energy primarily from others while introverts can become overloaded or drained by the outside world, and sometimes just don’t need or care about it.

“Parents and teachers aren’t working overtime turning extroverts into introverts,” Silverman says, “but they do try to remake introverts into extroverts. And they don’t need to.”

And we shouldn’t assume they will always struggle, experts say. Research shows introverts more readily regulate impulsive responses and avoid risks, may be able to think more quickly, concretely and creatively and get better grades (more Merit Scholars are introverted). Some research shows they are more attractive to others and have better relationships. They may even live longer.

“Introverts think before they act, digest information thoroughly, stay on task longer, give up less easily, and work more accurately,” says Susan Cain one of the leading introvert experts and advocates. Teachers should know (and can remind their quiet students) that the successful ranks of introverts include Abraham Lincoln, Albert Einstein and several tech company giants such as Bill Gates and Mark Zukerberg, along with celebrities like Michael Jordan, Christina Aguilera, and even Merryl Streep.

Zelenski’s research shows, however, that while introverts aren’t sad, with more engagement they could refine social skills (they often absorb themselves by observation and reflection) and gather more confidence and happiness, which he’s convinced they experience less than extroverts. Children also change, and over time introverts may become more interested in socializing or even leadership roles and regret not having developed those skills.

“They’ll feel great when they join in, and they’ll only do it out in the world,” says Cain. “But they need to engage on their own terms. So while they shouldn’t be sheltered them from difficult social situations, they should know that we understand and sympathize and want to help.” She and other experts say that introverts may need to be “nudged” by educators, and encouraged to participate and not fear making mistakes.

In the School

Change is often difficult for them, and preparation is key. It might be helpful if introverted students come in before the opening day, and are clear about plans for changes in the schedule or events like a field trips. Classes where rules are enforced about “no putdowns” will be easier for them.

Teachers should understand that introverts are not disinterested, says Silverman, although they have to learn how to advocate for themselves. Ask them if they want strategies for speaking up during class or seeking help later.

“Extroverts think out loud, while introverts mentally rehearse everything before they say it―and wish everyone else would,” says Silverman. “Classrooms don’t operate that way.”

Collaboration is a good skill to learn and will be required later in school and work, says child development expert Jennifer Miller, but by “hanging back to observe social situations” introverted children may in their own way learn the social and emotional skills that educators are now stressing. So, they may understand the importance of collaboration and do it later as they get more mature and figure out their own patterns for it.

Introverts also tend to be more self-aware, which leads to empathy and self-management, and they make responsible decisions because they listen well, are creative thinkers, and reflect and consider consequences, she says.

“When you call on an introvert,” says Silverman, “you always hear a pregnant pause while he or she rehearses the perfect pearl to share with the class.”

In group projects, teachers should perhaps encourage them to participate, but look for other options if possible and not expect them to change dramatically and become very talkative nor should they assess them unfairly if they participate less verbally.

As visual learners they can picture things and may synthesize and learn complex concepts easily through their own problem-solving methods, but struggle with directions, memorization, easy skills, and details, Silverman says. (So, for instance, they may figure out how to learn whole words rather than phonics.)

They should write down ideas before a brainstorming session, take notes during a discussion, and get extra time for responses when possible. Dyads, where they bounce ideas off another student before a discussion openly, might help. (It is best to correct or praise them privately too, Silverman says.)

Elementary school teachers are more likely to be extroverts, and high school teachers are more likely introverts, Silverman says. “Colleges are havens for introverts, and they often excel with all the introverted professors,” she says. “Introverts may appear smarter as they get older.”

Silverman says teachers should envision this scenario to help them understand:

Imagine that a group of teachers has been divided into introverts and extroverts and given a task to do with markers on butcher paper in a set time limit. The extroverts immediately start drawing on the butcher paper while they talk and decide exactly what they want the finished product to look like. We are doers—we process actively. The introverts are very quiet at first, thinking about the task, then they talk about it together and plan how to execute it. No marks are made on the butcher paper until around 15 minutes before the time is up. That’s the difference between action and reflection.

She also is fond of recalling a story a teacher told her after one of her lectures.

“Her middle school class was involved in small group projects and one group really wanted to hear the ideas of a particular student who was creative but introverted. She overheard one of them excitedly tell the boy: ‘We really need your input on this. Think about it and get back to us.’”

Omega Learning® Center is AdvancED accredited nationwide and provides tutoring and test preparation services for grades K-12. To find a learning center near you, visit OmegaLearning.com.

Source: http://www.educationworld.com/quiet-consideration-understanding-introverted-students-and-how-best-engage-them

6 Ways to Get Organized for Back to School

Putting the following strategies into action now will save a lot of time and anxiety later.

  1. Shift your schedules. The lazy, unstructured days of summer are ending, and so is your child’s freedom to sleep in and eat erratically. Ease them back into a school schedule by shifting their bedtime back to a school-day bedtime and waking them closer to the hour they’ll need to rise.
  2. Have a morning routine run-through. The week before school starts, start getting your child up, dressed, and fed at the same times as you would on a school day. Both you and your child will benefit from a few practice runs to smooth out trouble spots and get comfortable with the routine.
  3. Clean house. Go through your child’s clothes, and get rid of anything they have outgrown or worn threadbare. It’ll be easier to choose outfits if there’s less clutter. Do a thorough cleaning of their room and study area as well.
  4. Stock up on supplies. After you and your child are through cleaning, make a list of everything they’ll need for the coming year, from socks to crayons. Ask their teacher or the school for a list of supplies, and check what’s missing. Buy extras of essential items and store them for later.
  5. Get papers in order. While you’re calling the school, ask what paperwork your child will need to start. Take care of any missing vaccinations or forms ASAP, then gather all the papers in a large, clearly marked envelope or file and photocopy everything.
  6. Create calendar and file central. Set up an area with a large calendar so everyone in your family can see everyone else’s plans for that month. For added organization, color-code each family member and keep colored markers nearby so everyone can easily mark plans. Pen in after-school activities, lessons, play-dates, and family time. Nearby, set up file baskets or bins marked “To Be Signed,” “From School,” and “To School,” so your child can deposit papers you need to see in a regular place right after school and pick up things to go “To School” each morning.

Omega Learning® Center is AdvancED accredited nationwide and provides tutoring and test preparation services for grades K-12. To find a learning center near you, visit OmegaLearning.com.

Source: http://www.scholastic.com/parents/resources/article/back-to-school/6-ways-to-get-organized-back-to-school

Reading Enrichment Camp

Many students, especially struggling readers, forget some of what they’ve learned or slip out of practice during the summer months. As a result, those students can lose up to 3 months of academic reading progress that has a cumulative, long-term effect that can hold them back a grade. If your student is having trouble with vocabulary, reading comprehension, fluency, or writing skills, the summer is the best time to help them get back on track.

At Omega Learning® Center, we offer a Reading Enrichment Camp that will help your student discover the love of reading and writing this summer! Omega’s certified teachers will help students develop and improve the core fundamentals of reading and writing including sight words, vocabulary, comprehension, grammar, language arts, and writing skills. In our AdvancED® learning environment students build vital critical-thinking skills needed for reading and writing application. Find an Omega Learning® Center near you and learn more about our summer enrichment camps.

Omega Learning® Center is AdvancED accredited nationwide and provides tutoring and test preparation services for grades K-12. To find a learning center near you, visit OmegaLearning.com.

 

Why Omega Learning Teachers Are Special

Omega Learning® Center recognizes how important teachers are. We appreciate all of our teachers, tutors, and staff here at Omega Learning® Center. Here are our top reasons why Omega Learning® Center’s teachers are so special.

Omega Learning® Center tutors believe in:

  • Providing opportunity for growth
  • Building student confidence
  • Achieving academic success
  • Encouraging critical-thinking skills
  • Communicating directly with schools
  • Utilizing a tutoring system

Omega tutors are teachers. Our tutors are qualified, motivated, and certified teachers who care about your student’s success.

Omega tutors are educated. Many Omega tutors have master’s degrees and special education degrees, and all must complete the Omega training/certification program.

Omega tutors produce results. Omega tutors achieve results using our AIM Tutoring System®. The average academic growth is 2.2 years after completing our program.

Omega tutors are local. Our tutors live and work in our community. They believe in the power of a strong education and its value for your student’s future.

Omega tutors are dynamic. Our tutors engage their students and our OutpAce® curriculum, including auditory, visual, and tactile instructional methods to achieve accelerated growth and lasting results.

Omega tutors are connected. Omega tutors send daily email updates to our students’ parents and schoolteachers to keep everyone informed on their Academic Team.

Omega Learning® Center is AdvancED accredited nationwide and provides tutoring and test preparation services for grades K-12. To find a learning center near you, visit OmegaLearning.com.

State Test Preparation

Schools require standardized benchmarking “high stakes” tests to determine each child’s level of curriculum comprehension. Most states administer the standardized tests yearly in the spring for students in 3rd through 8th grade. These standardized tests can have a significant impact not only to the school but also to your student. The state test results are vital and may affect your student’s academic placement in future years, and even prevent promotion to the next grade level. No matter how you feel about this controversial assessment tool, it’s important for your child do their very best.

Now your student can take the state test before it counts! Omega Learning® Center administers a free State Test Evaluation to help students better prepare for their upcoming state test. Omega’s free State Test Evaluation is an an initial state-specific test administered in a proctored testing environment. Omega’s State Test Evaluation also includes completion of practice test sections, review of missed questions, strategic remediation, and validated test-taking strategies. Students benefit by taking Omega’s initial evaluation test to help our certified teachers customize each student’s test prep program.

Schedule your free State Test evaluation today! Stop by an Omega Learning® Center near you.  http://omegalearning.com/find-tutors/ 

Omega Learning® Center offers Tutoring K-12 with certified teachers for every subject in school.

7 Tips To Prevent Homework Battles

1. Create a homework station.

It doesn’t matter whether there’s a space in your house set aside for homework or a portable homework station. Having a place to keep everything your kid needs for homework can help prevent organization issues and homework battles.

Help your child stock the homework station with paper, sharpened pencils and other supplies needed daily. When your child sits down to work, make sure they have enough light and few distractions. And when done, have them do a quick check to see if anything needs to be replaced for tomorrow.

 

2. Use checklists.

There’s something very rewarding about being able to cross a task off a checklist. You can help your child learn how good that feels as well as teach them how to keep track of homework. All he or she needs is a small pad of paper on which they can list their assignments for the day. As your child completes each one, they can cross it off the list.

 

3. Create a homework schedule.

A homework schedule can help your child set a specific time for studying (and schedule in breaks between subjects). Help your kid find a time of day when they are able to concentrate, when you’re available to help and when they are not in a hurry to get somewhere else.

A homework schedule can also help your child keep track of long-term assignments and upcoming tests. Use a large wall calendar to write down due dates and tests. Then your child can work backward to add in study days before tests and break projects down into smaller chunks.

 

4. Choose and use a homework timer.

Homework timers are a great way to help keep an easily distracted child on track. A timer can also give your kid a better sense of time.

There are many types of timers to choose from—what’s best depends on your child. If he or she is distracted by sounds, a ticking kitchen timer may not be the ideal choice. Instead, try an hourglass timer or one that vibrates.

There are also homework timer apps that you can program for each subject. And don’t forget that your phone probably has a timer built right in, too!

 

5. Use a color-coding system.

Using colored dot stickers, highlighters, and colored folders and notebooks is a great (and inexpensive) way to keep organized. Ask your child to choose a color for each subject. Have him or her mark assignment due dates and test dates on the calendar with a sticker of the right color.

Before you file homework assignments and study guides in the appropriate notebook or folder, use a highlighter or sticker to mark the page with the right color. That way if the paper falls out, your child will know what class it’s for.

 

6. Mix it up a little.

For some kids, studying is tough because they need to learn material in different ways. If your child is having a hard time with a writing assignment, help him or her talk it through or act it out first. Use vocabulary words in everyday conversation—even if you have to be silly about it.

For math, use household items to help them figure out problems. Teach fractions with slices of pizza, for example. And help your child learn spelling words by letting your child text them to you. You can even help  master new facts by setting them to music!

 

7. Check in and check up.

You can’t do your child’s homework for them, but you can make sure they are doing it. Checking in to see if your child needs help or just to let them know you’re around may ease their homework stress. And don’t forget to look over their work at the end of the day, too!

Omega Learning® Center offers Tutoring K-12 with certified teachers for every subject in school. Stop by an Omega Learning® Center near you.  http://omegalearning.com/find-tutors/ 

Source: https://www.understood.org/en/school-learning/learning-at-home/homework-study-skills/7-tips-for-improving-your-childs-homework-and-study-skills

10 Study Tips for High School Students

College is hard and adapting to a new environment, culture and workload can make the transition to campus harder than students expect. But students who build strong academic habits now can alleviate some of the pressure. U.S. News collected tips from experts to help students find out which study skills and routines will help teens become star college students.

1.Ask for Help: College freshmen are often uncomfortable reaching out to their professors or tutoring services. Get in the habit of seeking  help when you need it now, and don’t wait until you’re falling, which may be too late to make a difference. Reach out to your teachers and take advantage of any tutoring or support services that your school provides. It can help you build the confidence and practice of asking for help that you’ll need in college, experts say.

2. Block Off Time to Study Outside of Class: You really have to force yourself to set that time aside and devote that time to understanding and trying to comprehend new material. Students may need to spend an hour or two  on college course work outside for each session. Getting in the habit of scheduling time to study will pay off in the long run.

3. Use Your Peers: Your classmates can help you better understand your material, experts say. Work with your classmates to absorb your lessons and build the communication skills you’ll need to survive group projects in college.

4. Get Organized. Encourage students to look through their syllabus, find out when exams and major assignments are due and work backwards to determine when to start working. Allow time to reach out for help if you need it.

5. Go to Sleep. Staying up late to binge-watch Netflix will be even easier to do when you leave home, but pulling all-nighters in college and downing energy drinks to cram for an exam can negatively affect your grades.

6. Eliminate Distractions. Technology can be a great study took, but if you get lost every time you log onto Snapchat or Twitter, it may be time for you to disconnect.

7. Maintain Your Health. College is stressful. Eating right and staying active will  help you keep your mind sharp. Students tend to do better when they have at least some sort of exercise incorporated into their daily activities.

8. Track Your Habits. Do you study better in your room or at the library? Do you need visual aids or recorded notes? Do you need more study time for math than English? Being self aware can  help students create a schedule that matches their needs. They need to be aware of their weaknesses and strengths coming in and they should know after high school what courses were the hardest for them.

9. Stop Procrastinating. Sometimes it’s not even that they’re struggling with academic content. They’re just not organized and they’re not managing their time effectively. For that reason, they could do poorly in certain courses. Students who wait to the last minute to study or do assignments score worse than their more prepared peers.

10. Work on Your Soft Skills. Read, write and learn how to work in teams. These tasks will help you build the communication and critical thinking skills that will help you ace your classes.

http://www.usnews.com/education/best-colleges/slideshows/10-college-study-tips-that-high-school-students-can-master-now