Educational Blog

Easy Ways to Get Everyone in the Giving Spirit

This year, create a new holiday tradition with your family — get involved in a charitable activity. It's an ideal way to teach your child values such as generosity, compassion, and gratitude, and prevent her from coming down with an annual case of "the gimmes." The months of November and December are a great time to get involved, as there are a plethora of opportunities to suit your family's interests and availability. It's also a chance to try out several different types of activities and find one your family can get involved in all year round. We've got a number... More »

Visual, Auditory or Tactile? Take the MyStudyStyle Assessment

Knowing your child's learning style is key to his or her school success. Most kids have a natural way of picking up new information. For example, they learn best either by listening, looking, or doing. Once you know your child’s learning personality, you can sidestep a lot of academic agita. There are three primary types of learning styles to which Omega Learning® Center caters:   Visual – You learn best through SEEING. You learn best by reading, watching a demonstration, and looking at graphics and illustrations.   Auditory – You learn best through HEARING. You learn best by hearing lectures, having information verbally repeated, and... More »

4 Writing Activities That Foster Thankfulness

In November, we think a lot about the things we're thankful for. We post about them on Facebook and Instagram. We spend weeks preparing for Thanksgiving dinner, and express our gratitude for the meal. But what are we doing to foster thankfulness in our children?In order to foster a thankful spirit, I came up with a list of four easy activities that will get kids thinking about the things they're thankful for.   1. Write Thank-You Notes  Bring back the tradition of having your child write thank-you notes for gifts received. Older children can write their own notes while younger... More »

Rising High School Seniors Action Plan

Senior year is a whirlwind of activities. This is a big year for your child as he or she balances schoolwork, extracurricular activities and the college application process. Use the suggestions below to help you and your child successfully navigate this important time.   Winter   Work together to apply for financial aid. Have your child contact the financial aid offices at the colleges in which he or she is interested to find out what forms students must submit to apply for aid. Make sure he or she applies for aid by or before any stated deadlines. Funds are limited,... More »

Halloween Safety Tips

For a tear-free celebration, observe these safety recommendations from the American Academy of Pediatrics, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Los Angeles Fire Department, and the National Safety Council.   Dress-Up Smarts:   Choose fire-retardant costumes. Look for a label that indicates flame-resistance on any costumes, wigs, and headpieces you purchase. If you're making the costume yourself, examine the fabric content and talk the salesperson to help you choose the least flammable material.   Use make-up instead of masks. Hypoallergenic, non-toxic face paint is a better choice than a mask, which may obscure your child's vision and hinder his breathing.... More »

ACT Test Day Checklist

• Report to your assigned test center by the Reporting Time (8:00 a.m.) listed on your ticket. You will NOT be admitted to test if you are late. • Bring a printed copy of your ticket to the test center. You will not be admitted to test if you do not have a printed copy of your ticket. • Bring acceptable photo identification. You will not be admitted to test if your ID does not meet the ACT* requirements. • Testing staff will check your photo ID and ticket, admit you to your test room, direct you to a seat,... More »

Fun Halloween Trivia for Kids

Does your child have a lot of questions about Halloween? Share fun facts — like how the holiday got its name and why we carve pumpkins as decorations — with your curious kid.   Why do we dress up? People used to believe that ghosts might visit the earth on this day, so some tricksters started to dress up as spirits to scare their unsuspecting neighbors!   Why is it on the 31st? To honor saints and martyrs, the Catholic Church deemed November 1st All Saints Day in the eighth century. The evening before was known as All Hallows’ Eve.... More »

Raise a Reader: A Parent Guide to Reading for Ages 11-13

Just as your  teen is now asserting her independence and also negotiating a new world, she is also starting a new world of responsibility in middle school. If you are feeling chagrined at the quality of your teen’s reading choices, suggest alternatives, but consider letting him choose his own books. Kids and teens like choosing their own books — 89 percent say their favorite books are the ones they picked out themselves. In most elementary schools, students have just one main teacher for the year. In middle school, your  teen will likely have a different teacher for each subject. Each... More »

What the Report Card Really Means

A, B, C is no longer as easy as 1, 2, 3. Today's student report cards go way beyond the simple letter grades of years past. Now, many school districts send home detailed accounts of each subject's content, student progress, social behavior, work habits, learning skills, and more. The Letter Lineup Don't expect to see traditional letter grades until 3rd or 4th grade. Prior to that, schools usually describe progress with a scale such as D for developing, E for expanding, S for satisfactory, and N for needs improvement. The kindergarten report card can be likened to a checklist of skills crucial... More »

Time for a Tutor? Grades 3-5

If your child is struggling, don't panic at the first bad report card or note from the teacher. Do some homework. Find out why they're falling behind — and what you can do to make a difference. While there are some normal developmental tasks a child should master at each age, the operative word is "normal" — and it has a very wide range. After reviewing the lists below, if you're concerned, check with your child's teacher, the school psychologist, or a reading specialist. Most likely, you'll get all the reassurance that you need. If not, you'll know how to... More »